Massey Accounting Company

making your business less taxing


Leave a comment

Beware of the mobile phone tax trap

 

It’s a well-known tax free benefit – an employer may provide one mobile phone per employee for both business and personal use without triggering a taxable Benefit-in-Kind (Section 319 ITEPA 2003).

Sounds simple enough but there are conditions:

• The mobile phone / sim-card must remain the property of the employer
• One phone per employee
• The contract must be between the employer and the mobile phone provider

It’s this final condition that often catches out micro companies that blissfully pay for the director’s mobile phone bill whilst the contract remains in the director’s personal name.

Whilst a seemingly minor technicality the tax treatment of reimbursement of mobile phone costs in this way triggers a costly Benefit-in-Kind Income Tax and National Insurance charge.

It has been reported that HMRC are taking a strict line on this matter, and when discovered, ordering assessments of often 4 years underpaid taxes averaging £500 before penalties and interest.

What’s the solution?

If your mobile contract isn’t in the company name – don’t overly worry – you’re not alone by a long stretch. To keep things practical (and in the real world) we suggest the following:

  • First of all, call your mobile provider to ask about their procedure for transferring the contract to the company (personally I found this surprisingly straight forward)
  • If there are extra charges to make the change during your contract, then wait until you’re out of your contract and try again – this is usually the easiest time to transfer your contract and you’re usually offered the same price as personal rate tariffs

Essentially, in our experience, it’s easier and cheaper than most people realise to review your mobile contracts yourself before HMRC do!

Source info: https://www.gov.uk/hmrc-internal-manuals/employment-income-manual/eim21779

Enjoy saving tax?

We have two videos to help on ourYouTube-logo-full_colorchannel; and for regular tax-tips follow our blog on  or click +Follow at the bottom of this page.

Advertisements


1 Comment

Optimum Directors’ Salary and Dividends for 2019/20

What is the optimum directors’ salary and dividend mix for 2019/20?

Small companies will usually pay their directors with a mix of salary and dividends. The level of the directors’ salary is usually set in order to avoid any income tax and national insurance. On this basis the recommended remuneration package for the forthcoming tax year is:

 

Upper limits (if intention is to fully utilise the basic rate tax band)


2019/20


2018/19

Directors’ salary – per annum

£8,632

£8,424

Dividends – per annum

£41,368

£37,926

It should be noted that dividends exceeding both the personal allowance and the dividend allowance of £2,000 will be taxed via the directors’ personal income tax return at 7.5%. Meaning that if dividends are paid all the way up to the basic rate band of £50,000 (2018/19 was £46,350) there will be a personal tax bill of £2,952 (last year £2,438)

Companies with more than just a single director on the payroll may benefit from the Employment Allowance which reduces the company’s Class 1 National Insurance contributions (Employer’s N.I.) by up to £3,000.

In such cases there may be an opportunity for directors to eke out a little more tax savings by paying themselves a salary of £12,500 and dividends up to a maximum of £37,500 (the overall tax saving between the director and the company being around £270).

This second option will not be the best fit for everyone. More than ever, personal circumstances must be carefully considered to give the best results.

Each client of ours will be receiving a personalised recommendation shortly.

Enjoy saving tax?

We have two videos to help on our YouTube-logo-full_color channel; and for regular tax-tips follow our blog on 
or click +Follow at the bottom of this page.


Leave a comment

Optimum Directors’ Salary and Dividends for 2018/19

What is the optimum directors’ salary and dividend mix for 2018/19? Or click here if you’re looking for our more recent 2019/20 recommendation.

Small companies will usually pay their directors with a mix of salary and dividends. The level of the directors’ salary is usually set in order to avoid any income tax and national insurance. On this basis the recommended remuneration package for the forthcoming tax year is:

 

Upper limits (if intention is to fully utilise the basic rate tax band)

2018/19

2017/18

Directors’ salary – per annum

£8,424

£8,164

Dividends – per annum

£37,926

£36,836

 

It should be noted that dividends exceeding both the personal allowance and the dividend allowance of £2,000 (previously £5,000) will be taxed via the directors’ personal income tax return at 7.5%. Meaning that if dividends are paid all the way up to the basic rate band of £46,350 (2017/18 was £45,000) there will be a personal tax bill of £2,438 (last year £2,138)

For those companies that have more than just a single director on their payroll then they will continue to benefit from the Employment Allowance which reduces the company’s Class 1 National Insurance contributions (Employer’s N.I.) by up to £3,000.

In such cases there may be an opportunity for directors to eke out a little more tax savings by paying themselves a salary of £11,850 and dividends up to a maximum of £34,500 (the overall tax saving between the director and the company being around £240).

This second option will not be the best fit for everyone. More than ever, personal circumstances must be carefully considered to give the best results.

Each client of Massey Accounting Company will be receiving a personalised recommendation shortly.

Enjoy saving tax?

We have two videos to help on ourYouTube-logo-full_colorchannel; and for regular tax-tips follow our blog on Google+ or click +Follow at the bottom of this page.


2 Comments

Optimal Directors’ Salary and Dividend Mix for 2017-18

Probably the most important post of the year for limited company directors!

Question: What’s the most tax efficient salary and dividend mix for the 2017/18 tax year?

An owner managed limited company will usually pay their directors / shareholders with a mix of salary and dividends.

The level of the director’s salary is usually set in order to avoid any income tax and national insurance. On this basis the recommended remuneration package for 2017/18 is:

Upper limits for 2017/18

Salary – per annum: £8,164 (last year £8,060)
Salary – per month: £680 (last year £671)

Dividend – per annum: £36,836 (last year £34,940)
Dividend – per month: £3,069 (last year £2,911)

It should be noted that since the introduction of the dividend ordinary tax rate of 7.5% on dividends over £5,000 there will be a personal tax bill of £2,138 (last year £2,025) if dividends are paid all the way up to the basic rate limit of £45,000 (last year £43,000).

For those companies that also have non-director employees on the payroll then they will continue to benefit from the Employment Allowance which reduces the company’s Class 1 National Insurance contributions (Employer’s N.I.) by up to £3,000.

In such cases there may be an opportunity for directors to eke out a little more tax savings by paying themselves a salary of £11,500 and dividends up to a maximum of £33,500 (the overall tax saving between the director and the company being around £234).

This second option will not be the best fit for everyone. More that ever, personal circumstances must be carefully considered to give the best results.

Each client of Massey Accounting Company will be receiving a personalised recommendation shortly.


Enjoy saving tax?

We have two videos to help on ourYouTube-logo-full_colorchannel; and for regular tax-tips follow our blog on Google+ or click +Follow at the bottom of this page.


Leave a comment

Optimal Directors’ Salary for 2016-17

Probably the most important post of the year for limited company directors!

If you’re looking for the 2017/18 optimal directors’ salary, check out this year’s post here. Otherwise for our 2016/17 article read on.

An owner managed limited company will usually pay their directors’ / shareholders’ with a small salary + dividends.

The level of the director’s salary is usually set in order to avoid any income tax and national insurance. On this basis the recommended remuneration package for 2016-17 is:

Upper limits for 2016-17

Salary – per annum: £8,040 (last year £8,040)
Salary – per month: £670 (last year £670)

Dividend – per annum: £34,960 (last year £30,891)
Dividend – per month: £2,913 (last year £2,574)

It should be noted that with the introduction of the dividend ordinary tax rate of 7.5% there will be a personal tax bill of £2,025 if dividends are paid all the way up to the maximum basic rate limit of £34,960 (yes, that’s a personal tax bill of up to £2,025 compared to £nil last year!).

For those companies that also have non-director employees on the payroll then they will continue to benefit from the Employment Allowance which reduces the company’s Class 1 National Insurance contributions (Employers N.I.) by up to £3,000 (last year £2,000).

In such cases there may be an opportunity for directors to eke out a little more tax savings by paying themselves a salary of £11,000 and slightly lower dividends of £32,000 (the overall tax saving between the director and the company being around £237 (last year £203)).

This second option will not be the best fit for everyone. This year, more that ever, personal circumstances must be carefully considered to give the best results.

Each client of Massey Accounting Company will be receiving a personalised recommendation shortly.


Enjoy saving tax?

We have two videos to help on ourYouTube-logo-full_colorchannel; and for regular tax-tips follow our blog on Google+ or click +Follow at the bottom of this page.